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a federal laws if they are prohibited from enforcing federal immigration laws. they don't certainly want to enforce federal laws they deemed to be unconstitutional. oregon sheriff tim mueller says it is all about the second amendment. he joins us next. executive orders, executive actions. this president's actions on the second amendment constitution. attorneys join us to argue the issues and the cnstitution. issues and the cnstitution. the. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you ga my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive. ♪ lou: well, the algerian government reportedly rejected offers of help from the united states and european powers, and there are also reports that they rejected a request by the white house to be extraordinarily careful and cautious in dealing with the hosta
lynn for us. >> thank you. >> next, a foreign on state and federal marijuana laws. then a discussion on combating terrorism and national security laws. after that, google executive eric schmidt taking about the latest innovations. >> tomorrow on "washington journal," atlantic editor at large steve clemons and gary schmitt discuss former nebraska senator chuck hagel. and we talk about the book "breakout nations" exploring what makes economies breakout or break down. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern live on c-span. >> now a discussion about legalizing marijuana and federal state relations. colorado and washington state recently legalized the recreation nal use of marijuana but it continues to be illegal under federal law. this brookings event is just over an hour and a half. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> welcome, everybody. thank you very much for coming. my name is jonathan roush. i'm a guest scholar in governance studies here at brookings. it's very good of you to come on a cold day wh
clamoring for higher sentences and tougher three strikes laws, and lawyers undercutting these provisions by bargaining them away so some people get special deals and other people, who are just stubborn enough to go to trial, wind up getting heavier punishments and the voters react bought is feels like it's hidden and departments on your connections or your lawyer rather than on what you did. the frustrating thing here is we have a democracy, and the system should be run for what the people think it's about, which is blaming and punishing. but instead we have a system where people don't understand what going on in their open system. we can't go back to an era where every case was tried to a jury. our system is too clogged. too expensive. trials take too long. over the past half century, we've made him that too complicated. but we can try to simplify and include ordinary people. let the victims have a say at the trial. let the defendants speak rather than everything through the lawyers, at least at the sentencing hearing. offer more encouragement and opportunities for remorse and apology a
to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws to their acts of pretended legislation. of course the constitution in 1776 was the british constitution. but that concept is the same. there were some foreign jurisdiction is going to have authority over us. we're going to examine now the ideas and practices that those who in our time has combined with others to subject us or tend to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from an early isi scholar, richard weaver. so let's examine the global governance project. these ideas are not hard to find. you don't have to be invited to seek rebuilder broker conspiracy meeting, any of this out. it's right out in the open on the website, and so u.n., european union, american bar association, dean said most law schools at american universities, all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government. this form of transnational government. so let's look at for people, just some quick views of players who have given a taste of the concept global governance
because they may be part of a national law enforcement database? how is that going to prevent any crime? you know a tiny fraction of murders occur from mentally ill people. there is no connection between reality and the president is proposing, whether it's newtown, violence on the street. what we need is criminal control. it's not a problem with mentally ill people or people that legally have arms, it's not a problem with a whole bunch of people, but this thing seems to address. here is the bigger problem. not only does he use the obamacare law to force doctors to report on their patients -- by the way, here is a question. let's say a doctor doesn't report on a patient because he doesn't think the patient is dangerous. that patient goes out and kills somebody. the family. person that was killed, that doctor a legal obligation under obama's legislation to reported it and -- says, i didn't know. that doctor is going to be caught up in litigation forever whether he failed to report or should have report. i can give you a thousand examples like that. these are private citizens dealing deput
. and that's really where his eyes have been. until he comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> and now, more from booktv's college series. we sat down with ste nose bibas at the university of pennsylvania's annenberg school for communication to discuss his book, "the machinery of criminal justice." he argues that our criminal justice system has become a process that values efficiency and speedy processing over reforming criminals and healing victims and their families. it's about innocents. it's about ten minutes. >> host: and now joining us on booktv is author and professor stephanos bibas whose new book, "the machinery of criminal justice," is published by oxford university press. professor bibas, do we have an efficient criminal justice system? >> guest: we've got a system tahas moved from what people expect it to be, a public morality play where we blame and punish and then reintegrate people who do wrong and heal victims to one that's been taken over by the lawyers. we have professionals who have max
a victim of government intimidation and a run away prosecutor. >> while there's no law or set of laws that can prevent every sinceless act of violence completely, no piece of legislation that will prevent he every tragedy, every act of evil, if there's even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there's even one life that can be saved, then we've got an obligation to try it. >> paul: welcome to the journal editorial report, i'm paul gigot, that was president obama rolling out the plan to curb gun violence and the president outlined 23 executive actions, including more steps to make more federal data available from background checks and increased access to mental health services and he called on congress to reinstate the federal assault weapons ban and prohibit high capacity gun magazines that can hold more than ten rounds. so, what's likely to get passed and what difference will it make? let's ask wall street journal columnist and political he editor and washington columnist kim strassel. >> has a hypothetical, let's assume that everything the president is proposing becomes l
is in the midst of a serious conversation about guns. the nra has been clear thought would meet any gun laws with serious resistance. >> they are getting the message out rncht president's kids more important than yours? why is he skeptical but putting armed security in schools when his kids are protected at their schools? >> jon: and why does he get to veto bills and command an army when we don't? all right so the conversation has started and we're off to a deplorable start. [ laughter ] i swear to you if i didn't know any better and i'm not a big conspiracy guy, i would think the nra is an elaborate after vant geard joaquin phoenix style joke or a false flag operation run by michael moore in an attempt to discredit responsible gun owners. your response, mr. president. >> i believe the second amendment guarantees an individual right to bear arms. i believe most gun owners agree we can respect the second amendment while keeping an irresponsible law breaking few from inflicting harm on a massive scale. >> jon: interesting open on his part. i thought he was going to say if you bring up my kids
would be what about the other states? are there other similar states that have the same types of laws like florida? he would want me to make a comparison. -- you would want me to make a comparison. europe has about the same rate of multiple victim shootings as the united states. it is not just the norway attack that you had in 2011 but before a new town, the country with the , the countrynewton with tehe two worst public school shootings in the world was germany. europe had had the three worst public schools shootings. germinate, it takes one year to get a bolt-action rifle. you have to go under two psychological screening tests. bill landes at the university of chicago -- the reason so much empirical work is being done here, it is easy to compare the 50 states. we have similar types of laws, we have data that is compatible across the state, you have different states that changed their laws at different times a you can have a lot of different tests. bill and i have looked at things like assault weapons bans because different states have different ones, background checks, waiting perio
will hear from a constitutional law professor adam winkler. from the johns hopkins school of public health in baltimore. this is about 20 minutes. >> he is certainly one of the great emerging voices, insightful and influential of the nature of the meaning of the second amendment in the wake of the supreme court's decision, so thank you for joining me in this effort. i want to thank the organizers, everyone from the president down to staff that has organized a terrific and hopefully impact full conference. i am not going to talk with any power. as a law professor i do not like the focus on anyone but me. i am here to talk about the amendment to the constitution and what it says about major reform proposals being considered in the wake of the new town massacre. as you probably know, the second amendment provides a well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to bear arms shall not be infringed. it is almost as if james madison just discovered this wonderful new thing, the comma, and wanted to put it in there as many times as possible, and is
on state and federal marijuana laws. then a discussion on combating terrorism and national security. after that a look at the projected cuts in defense spending. tomorrow on "washington journal" we'll discuss president obama's nominee for defense secretary former nebraska senator chuck hagel. our guest is gary schmidt with the american enterprise institute followed by emerging markets in developing country. we're joined with morgan stanley investment management. he spends one week in a different developing country and will discuss his book "breakout nations." live on washington journal on c-span. >> if you ask how many are self-identified libertarians, depending on which poll you look at, you might be getting between 10% and 15%. if you ask questions like if you give people a battery of questions about different ideological things like do you believe in x and do you believe in y? then you track those, depending on which poll you get up to 30% of americans that call themselves libertarian. if you ask the following question -- are you economically conservative but socially liberal you say ha
use if used for any lawful purpose, and if that is the case they are generally used for unlawful purposes. an assault weapons ban might not satisfy the demands, might not 4 federal assault weapons ban which was pretty notorious for loopholes and allowed manufacturers to use pretty much the same weapons, i think the government could have difficulty defending a law the highest court to consider the assault weapons ban was the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit and it recently upheld a ban in d.c. the court assumed the weapons were in common use but the ban imposed no real burden on the people's ability to a firearm for self-defense. similarly, it applies to a restriction on high-capacity magazines, which we treat separately than an assault weapons ban. what a ban on the sale of high- capacity magazines, capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition be unconstitutional? i think it is a similar analysis. common use? , used for self-defense? it upheld the restriction on the sale of high-capacity magazines as well. yes, they are probably in common use. yes, there are mil
law enforcement official, gun rights activists who know firsthand why so many americans have chosen to arm themselves in order to protect their families. first, let's recap what was proposed earlier this we thiek. in addition, the president outlined legislative proposals and calling for the passage of a universal background check, something that critics say could lead to a gun ordinance data base and wants the assault weapons ban reinstated, an a ten round limit on magazines, and restrictions on bullets that can be possessed and manufactured and discussed a new gun trafficking law that penalizes those who help criminals obtain firearms, on wednesday, the americans called on americans to pressure their ehe lekted representatives in supporting these measures. let's take a look. >> get them on record, ask your member of congress if they support universal background checks to keep guns out of the wrong hands, ask if they support a ban on military style assault weapons and high capacity magazines, if they say no, ask them why not. ask them what's more important, doing whatever it takes t
is georgetown university law center professor -- excuse me, law center dean, william trainor. thanks for watching. >> issues like immigration and gun control and what's done with it particularly now in the wake of the terrible murders of children in newtown, connecticut, and privacy and civil liberties and judicial nominations. a couple years ago i had the privilege to introduce senator leahy as he spoke at the new see yum -- newseum, that was a fascinating speech and i know today will be a very important speech on a very important series of topics. after the senator speaks we'll then have question and answer period. let me present to you senator leahy. [applause] >> thank you very, very much. they were fortunate when they had you down there, but my alma mater is fortunate to have you here now. you said about making the choice of georgetown. i was saying to my wife and others, that as i was preparing for this speech i thought, again, just how pleased i made the choice i did on committee assignments. i actually look forward to being back here at georgetown to talk about my agenda. i h
is right, explainn? >> i think it is a silly code to have and when you have something in the law it is applied evenly to everyone and they should be forced to follow the law. down the road change the law and make it where you can grow your veggie garden. if this is a law, the law is an ass. >> this shows the idiacy of government. can't make a distinction between a vegetable garden and raising python and having a toxic waste dump. they say it doesn't enhance values, let the market decide. >> laws today don't have a common sense. there is so little common sense . doesn't it add to the perception. >> let the market decide. this is more me, me, me stuff. people who object to it. bought a house with man cured front lines and what is happening to them. i sent a friend to look at it is a farming front and out of place. the people who bought house next door. their property values have gone down. he should let the market decide to take a hit. >> emac, what about property rights. >> they should put a walmart in the corner. >> i am kidding. orland open where this is happening, professes to
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
in saudi arabia for killing a baby in her care. and cyber war in the philippines. why activists a new law governing online activity is like a return to military rule. >> hello and welcome. the weather pattern changes. a large cloud across central. . we have a little clearer air across the u.k., but the wind coming from the north is quite cold air. there's an actor frontal system to go with it. snow pushing across the alpine region. a little respite on wednesday for the u.k. with top temperatures at zero. -- at 2 degrees in london. a lot of rainfall expected across the mediterranean. a very unsettled picture. highs of eight degrees in rome. across the mediterranean, if a brisk winds expected out of the west. a temperature of 18 in benghazi. and some rainfall for tunisia and algeria. farther south, looking fine. monsoon rain continues pushing towards the south. still a chance of rain in gabon. looking at highs of 30 degrees. heavy rain expected in angola, zambia, botswana, and parts of mozambique. in south africa, west of johannesburg, but it should be dry in cape town. >> welcome back. the
, and mandarin. and then -- and then, roger, you will -- >> yes. i am an attorney in private practice. the laws in this area are strict compliance laws, and they are very specific. the federal law since 1990 indicates issues from 1998. all businesses, such as a grocery store, a dentist's office, restaurants, a doctor's office, virtually anything that a member of the public comes into the -- comes into needs to be a barrier-free. we will go over what barriers are. every public accommodation needs to be wheelchair-accessible. there are also other other forf disability. most of the issues we are hearing about are wheelchair accessibility issues. there is a small group of private individuals who are wheelchair-down that go around the city and they look at small businesses. and i dare say anybody in small restaurants have some accessibility issues. it is another attempt at making your building wheelchair accessible. i am not sure which of you may be merchants and which it may be landlords. the law applies to both. and that means you were 100% liable for any barriers to access and any damages that m
needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
create new laws, how do they know they would be effective? that's one of the things that in covering congress you see that up close, is while they understand that there is a critical need, it's an issue that matters to people, what can they do to would actually make a difference if they put all this political capital into it. so background checks might be a place to begin. high capacity magazines, there might be a place to start with that. well, manufactures will then adjust to work around whatever a new law would b it's complex, it's difficult and one of the most important things to watch is the impact of the president's sort of campaign style tour, when he visits places around the country, urges people to take action, will we hear the phones going off in this place? will people be emailing and writing to their members of congress demanding some sort of action? that's the sort of thing that members of congress pay attention to. and we don't have a sense yet of where people are in terms of not just the polling, but what would they be willing to do to reach out to their own personal m
's program is false and misleading. >> tough tough from mayor guiliani who said stricter gun laws will make it difficult for the police to do their job and give the bad guys an advantage. but guiliani would back an assault weapon's ban with conditions. hello. i am uma. live from the nation's capitol, starting right now. >> we begin with a breaking story that continue to raise concerns over seas. we have new respects coming in moment by moment on the four-day hostage situation in algeria. the country's new's agency said 7 hostages were killed by militants before the special forces stormed in. there is breaking details, greg? >> you are right. as with everything in the story there are shifting numbers and facts and seemed to be in algeria, that stand off is over and at least one report is saying that more americans are free. algerian security special forces stormed the last bastion of the al-qaida linked armed militants in the natural gas complex. according to the algerian government. 11 militants still hole would up there were kill also 7 foreign hostages were killed by the militants themsel
of solar power, for example. something similar to moore's law applying to solar panels. >> it's not actually fully moore's law, there's also sort of the china law which is china overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. [laughter] which is sort of why the panels are so low. but it's close. >> but do you see technology as transforming our energy situation? >> it is. and i think although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented these new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are american technological successes that have enabled us to sort of find more of this stuff. and, again, we can decide -- we can have a separate discussion as to how to regulate them and so forth which is very controversial. but the fact of the matter is that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is, ultimately, the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive s
to "hannity". right behind me are law abiding new york gun own ires. their names were printed because they are legal owners of a firearm. thanks to the newspaper president and publisher janet hecheland and editor karen mcbride the families of the people sitting behind me and the audience are put at risk and privacy trampled on. they are here to voice their frustration and fears. we are going to examine what legal action they can take to fight back against the blatant invasion of privacy. how are you doing tonight? >> good. >> let me start a quick show of hands. you have all been outed. almost everybody, right? you have not. you three. so i want to make sure who has been. how many of you feel angry about what has happened here? everybody. how many of you feel your privacy has been invaded? how many feel you are less safe because of what has happened? everybody. why less safe? >> not so much i feel less safe i feel worried about my neighbors now there are people who never even thought about carrying a firearm and they are worried. they are worried their house is like a shopping list for
collaboration, communes case and experience of all of members of our community, teachers, law enforcement, and the affected families will work to make our schools safer, stronger, and more united. that's why we're here today to prevent another sandy hook. we all have to work together to end gun violence. i hope we can continue that conversation today and make our children safer. thank you. >> i would like to thank our leader and co-chair for this honor. we come to this room today from different places and many different backgrounds. the last few months we have seen too many of our fellow countrymen gunned down in the streets. i represent camden, new jersey. a city of 80,000 have had 70 homicides this year. we see our neighbors die in shopping malls, movie theaters, college campuses and horrifically 31 days ago an elementary school. we are bonded together by one common conviction and that is our belief that is not inevitable. we can make choices to stop this from happening again. we believe that consistent with good medical practice, we can improve our mental health system so those who are
at law and numerous others. a defect in the yadaa law has emerged which seriously penalizing the micro small businesses. and is causing many to close their doors. the requirement that the merchant pay all attorney fees and costs of litigation in the application of strict liability penaltis is driving many of the neighborhood businesses out of business. the community and the neighborhoods lose and the disabled community loses. all because of the harsh penalties and punitive costs involved. implementation, we can afford, but not the cost of implementation or penalties. therefore, i challenge all our legislators in the county, state and federal levels to remedy this problem. again, i thank you. remember, the by word is "implementation, not penalties." thank you. [ applause ] [ applause ] >> next item. >> commissioners item 4, general public comment. this allows members of the public to comment generally on matters within the commission's purview and suggest future agenda items for the commissioner's consideration. discussion item. >> are there any members of public here to discuss any
to "hannity" and right behind me sitting in our audience tonight are law abiding new york gun owners. now, their names and addresses were printed by a local new york news, simply because they are legal owners of firearms. thanks to the publisher, the families of the people behind me sitting in our audience have not been at risk and privacy trampled on and tonight they're here to voice their fru we're going to examine what legal action they can take against the blatant invasion of privacy and thanks to all of you for being here. how are you all doing tonight? let me start with a quick show of hands from everybody here, you've all been outed and how many here have been outed, almost everybody, right? you have not and you three, so i want to make sure who has that -- how many of you feel angry about what has happened here? everybody. how many of you feel your privacy has been invaded? how many feel you are less safe because of what has happened? everybody. all right, let's start. why, let's say. >> not so much-- i feel worried about my neighbors because now they're people who never thought o
in the troubled region of afghanistan and pakistan. he said we would carry on this fight while upholding the law and our values and we would work with our allies and partners wherever possible. he also made it clear we would not hesitate to use military force against terrorists who don't pose a direct threat to america. he said he had intelligence about terrorists, even as in pakistan, he would act to protect the american people. it is especially fitting we have this discussion today. one year ago, president tibullus facing the scenario he discussed at the woodrow wilson center five years ago. he did not hesitate to act. soon thereafter, are special operations forces were moving toward the compound in pakistan where we believed the osama bin laden might be hiding. at the end of the day, president obama could confirm justice had been delivered to those responsible for the attacks on september 11, 2001. the-phyllis sullivan law and was armas strategic blow yet. credit for that success belongs to the courageous forces that carries out -- carried out that mission at extraordinary threat to their liv
law enforcement only focused on investigation. chief suhr recognize importance of having advocacy groups located directly in the special victims unit. family can meet with investigators and have access to services in the system as they move forward. with the efforts of kathy black and -- svu has a children's room available which offers a safe environment for children exposed to family violence. child abuse is one of the toughest crimes for investigators. children are among the most vulnerable victims. thankfully there are those like kathy baxter who are constantly fighting for the prevention of child abuse. i believe partnership with outside agencies have allowed us to find justice during this complex investigation. another important component of svu is the -- unit. those members solely on internet crimes against children. the cases are complex and require persistent and dedication to identify and locate perpetrators who possess and distribute child pornography. we are only one of many law enforcement agencies across the region who actively participate in the sil
oath of office. our witnesses hail from every walk of life, education, academia, law enforcement, and public service. we are stroorl grateful to have with us, dr. janet robinson, superintendent of schools of newtown, connecticut. dr. emily nottingham, mother of gabe zimmerman, all of you may know was the victim in tucson nearly two years ago. chief scott knight, police department from minnesota to give us a school from middle america, from rural areas. and mayor michael nutter, president of the u.s. conference of mayors who has been a leader on this issue for a very long time. your voices and your contributions are playing a critical role in our effort to take these long overdue actions. we look forward to hearing your ideas and testimony and answering the call to action on gun violence prevention. we are especially pleased to be doing so on a day when our president, as we continue to mourn with the families of newtown, has told us that the time for action is now. we must do everything in our power to stop such terrifying violence in the future. we recognize these challenges are
the federal law they're much more common in the state's that don't do much of the gun shows and in the state's generating some publicity i heard that open air market that i've shown you pictures of have basically closed with the promoter saying you can't sell guns there so i went back and this time shooting the video from the united corps but indeed they have absolutely no gun sales but everybody has congregated about 150 feet up against the building. he was relocated about a 32nd flock. the other thing that happened, and jamie was kind enough to mention they were kind of winding down the office in the city of new york sent a team of private detectives out and we talked to cameras and we talked on how to try to avoid detection and talked about some gun shows we might want to go to. i had one guy walking around with a camera and these guys were pros. the allies and the years of engagement that said you can't talk to anybody but they were not so hampered and the shot a video and i'm going to show it to you. >> i'm going to let this speak for itself. >> i need to see your id. >> no background c
suspension of the tobacco sales permit. the reason for suspension, violation of state law and the san francisco health code which proprohibit the indoor smoking of tobacco products. director's case no. smk12-09 and we'll start with the appellant. you have seven minutes >> good evening, my name is bashir shahin, the owner of marrakech restaurant. thank you to the board of appeals for giving us a chance to express our thoughts and feelings. i am not here to argue or ask for anything unreasonable. just hoping that you will give us some leniency andtry to give us some mercy on this case, which is a small family business, trying to keep our doors open. we have been in business for the last 16 years. i have clean record with all departments. for the last few years we have been hit very hard by the recession and economy and it's been hard to keep our doors as well. we like to comply with the ordinance, with any laws that come through. just this particular matter is kind of confusing and that is why we got into this argument. and we're hoping to resolve it and get better results from this.
. amendments and they need to be [applause] all across the country, law enforcement and the public are calling upon congress to strengthen our nation's laws. i ask you he our call and enact these sensible measures that will prevent further bloodshed. thank you. [applause] >> thank you all very much for what has been a most extraordinary, a powerful testimony. and prescriptions for us to take back and thank you for giving us the strength and the resolve to help make these changes. we cannot do it without you. i think you know we hope you know we are with you in trying to make these changes. we are now going to move to questions. i will introduce my colleague, mike thompson. a member of one of his vice chairs on the violence committee. we will have a one minute question and that will be when we get to dealing with our members. >> thank you. it gives me great pleasure to introduce one of the vice chairs on the task force to prevent violence. an expert in juvenile justice. our colleague from california in juvenile justice, and our and gentleman from virginia. mr. bobby scott. already had recommend
i have been former law enforcement and i should bring to the attention of the people at some time ago, the supreme court made a decision that said the police do not have a duty to protect the individual citizen, only society at large. what does that mean to you? people need to realize that the police are mostly reactionary when it comes to a crime or when you need to call them. a lot of times, while they are waiting for them to get there, the crime has occurred and the perpetrators have left. i carry concealed and i have been doing it for some years. i know that if i was in a situation where there was somebody going nuts with a gun and killing people, i would not have to think about reacting to that situation. people need to realize when they pass all of these laws, it is just the camel's nose under the tent. people make a mistake when they think this is going to go smoothly and people are going to give up their rights easily. just food for thought. it is a right and it should not be infringed upon. it's a right and have a great day. >> on tuesday see, calling from omaha, neb.. >>
rights trumped, this new criminal law. and unfortunately, they prevailed. now, i don't think congress when it passed the federal communications decency act meant to allow companies to with kind of knowing disregard for the effects of their practices to enable this. but this is the challenge we face still and that we're preempted from the field. so we're going to try to go back again and work on this. backpage.com makes millions of dollars a year off of this practice. it's one of their primary practices s escort advertising, and they refuse to stop it. other online advertising companies that have this practice don't have the same problem. that's what my police department reports to me. the next step we're taking in seattle is we're going to have a conference of mayors up and down the i-5 corridor because what we know is these young women are brought from town to town. seattle police department studied this, and they tracked one phone number, all right, that was being advertised. and, again, we don't know whether it was underage or not, but neither does back page. and of course it was i
and we decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might refle
a reality. because while there is no law or set of laws that can prevent every senseless act of violence completely, no piece of legislation that will prevent every tragedy, every act of evil, if there's even one thing we can do to reduce this violence, if there's even one life that can be saved, we've got an obligation to try. and i'm going to do my part. as soon as i'm finished speaking here, i will sit at that desk and i will sign a directive giving law enforcement, schools, mental health professionals and the public health community some of the tools they need to help reduce gun violence. we will make it easier to keep guns out of the hands of criminals by strengthening the background check system. we will help schools hire more resource officers, if they want them, and develop emergency preparedness plans. we will make sure mental health professionals know their options for reporting threats of violence. even as we acknowledge that someone with a mental illness is far more likely to be a victim of violent crime than the perpetrator. and while year after year those who oppose even mo
misdemeanor stalking laws do not include as an element the use or attempted use of physical force or threat with a deadly weapon. therefore, they are not included under the federal gun bans. if we change the laws, if we expanded the laws to cover these three groups of people, we may be able to effect an even greater decrease in intimate partner homicide. but enforcement is a big issue here. implementation and enforcement. these laws stand or fall on how they are implemented and enforced. so we could provide the resources and support needed for states and local systems to implement and enforce these laws. possibly a training center where jurisdictions that have gotten it down, they're better at this, can train other jurisdictions on how to do it, on how to have police officers go into the home of somebody who's newly-prohibited and gather those firearms that they know they have. if we enforce these laws along with including more people, more dangerous individuals under the categories that are covered, public safety can be increased, and the risk to intimates can be reduced. thanks. [applause
.s.a. a super pac. we all know, are pretty familiar with the super pac law in that there should be no coordination between a campaign and super pac and here you have a major co chair going over to the other side without anyone sort of raising an eyebrow and then once he gets there, he makes all these phone calls and raises a bunch of money. i was never able to confirm how much he raised. i think that number we gave in the question was overblown, but that's what i thought at the time. and, you know, so he starts, so this is also a very sensitive subject. certainly, you know, you have obviously, he is very sensitive about clearly did not approve of president obama's decision to relieve stanley mcchrystal. >> i love the way you handled that, you know, exchange with him, because he is obviously very hostile toward you. even after that exchange, you keep pressing him to answer the question. let's go to the next video where you don't seem annoyed by him at all and you continued to ask him to answer your question: >> cenk: michael. >> he had just said that in the ballroom as a joke, i
at an elective office, i think it's a public action. or it could translate into this. because state law says once you raise $1,000 or more, you effectively become a committee. >> you just have to function in public. >> well, i do feel like the way this reads right now, that if i collected $1,000 from five friends, which i was told to use to try to convince somebody to run for elective office, and i spent that money by taking them out to -- entertaining them for an evening, that this would not be covered. that would not be covered about i this. i don't know if we're intending to know about that kind of of activity nort. but i don't think we're intending to cover that. . >> in that situation you are not spending money to convince the voters. >> true. >> so i think leaving out the word "public" is okay. >> okay. any other comments from commissioners on decision point 1? public comment? >> david pillpa. i'm trying to kind of work through this language, including the top of page 2, lines 1-4. sorry, it's giving me a headache. i would suggest a few points. on line 17 and 18, i would reword it
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